Our tour guide didn’t actually tell us much about the area (one reason why it may be worth doing this hike independently) but he did organise our accommodation (which was great) and our food (which was not so great).

As I mentioned above, the tour also included a stop at Cruz del Condor to see the amazing condors up close (I’m pretty sure most tours would include this). We were told that they kill donkeys to attract the condors to this spot but it’s the only way to guarantee an up-close view so we didn’t mind.

On the 3 day trek (the same route can be completed in two days), each day consists of only about 4 hours of walking but the descent into the canyon on day one and the ascent out of the canyon on day three were incredibly challenging.

Accommodation was basic but far better than camping. The place on the first night had double rooms and best of all electricity (meaning cold beer!). We stayed in a dorm on the second night but why would you really care about your room when you are swimming in a resort-style swimming pool at the bottom of a harsh rocky canyon in Peru?!

On the final day we were offered mules to carry one person or four backpacks out of the canyon for 50 soles (about $25AU). After a bit of debating it was decided we would share one for our packs. There were people in our group who rode donkeys out but it certainly wasn’t something I considered. I came to hike this canyon!

 

Andean Condor at Cruz del Condor - Peru

A stop at Cruz del Condor to see the Andean Condor was part of the tour package we bought through our hostel. If planning to hike the canyon independently, make sure you stop here for a look anyway.

 

The group departs Cabanaconde - Colca Canyon Trek - Peru

The walk begins from the town of Cabanaconde.

 

Colca Canyon - Peru

One of our first views of Cañón del Colca.

 

A cactus in the Colca Canyon - Peru

Some of the vegetation in and around the canyon is spectacular

 

Beware of donkeys! - Colca Canyon - Peru

Beware of donkeys on the narrow mountain tracks. They can kick when spooked, so you really don’t want to be on the wrong side of them.

 

Colca Canyon - Peru

The views at every turn will take your breath away.

 

The descent into Colca Canyon - Peru

Resting on the long and knee-destroying descent into Cañón del Colca.

 

The Colca River - Peru

We were very happy to see The Colca River.

 

Colca Canyon - Peru

The view from our room on the first night of the trek. Not bad, huh?

 

Locals - Colca Canyon - Peru

The villages hikers pass through are only accessible by foot or donkey.

 

Colca Canyon - Peru

Views along the trail.

 

Colca Canyon - Peru

At the end of a day’s hiking, the rewards don’t get much better than this.

 

Colca Canyon - Peru

The final day’s trail, zig-zagging it’s way out of the canyon.

 

Colca Canyon - Peru

Looking back on The Oasis, after what already seemed like an eternity of climbing.

 

Map: If hiking without a guide, you will probably find maps in Arequipa. We had a guide, so no map was required.
Last Visited: 30/07/2009
Length (km): 22 km
Time (hrs/min): 3 days (including the return trip from Arequipa, and a Condor viewing stop at Cruz del Condor)
Grade: Moderate / Difficult
Return / Circuit / One-Way / Partial Circuit: Circuit
Park: Colca Canyon National Park
Closest Town: Cabanaconde (the walk begins from the town)
Maximum Elevation: approx. 3,500 m (according to MapMyHike.com)
Total Ascent: approx. 1,200 m (according to our guide)
Further Info: WikiPedia entry: Colca Canyon and BestHike.com page: Colca Canyon Trek

Getting There: We made our own way to Arequipa and booked the tour through our hostel (inc. transfers from Arequipa and a stop at Cruz del Condor). The hike can definitely be done independently but since we used a guide, I wouldn’t have a clue how to go about doing that. It might be worth checking the Lonely Planet Thorntree forums searching the web for advice.

 

Have you visited the Colca Canyon? If you have any stories, updates or corrections, please let us know by commenting below.

Are you interested in more from Bushwalking Blog? You can either sign-up for the e-mail newsletter, or get updates via the RSS feed, Facebook or Twitter.